Archive for the ‘Imaginary interviews’ Category

Imaginary interview part I.

March 12, 2009

Thank you for agreeing to stop work on your artist statement, and granting us this interview.
Not a problem, the statement is what it is.  I welcome the interruption.

First off, why do you paint animals?
I paint animals because with animals I can communicate a whole range of feelings and activities independent of class, gender, age, time etc.  I can use animals as timeless actors without any guilt of exploitation.  They are individuals, but soulless individuals.  There is a lot of freedom in that, it is almost like using slightly ambiguous words that (hopefully) a lot of people can understand and relate to.

Is relating to an audience important to you?
I hope so.  Usually if I think a painting turns out ok it is because it helps me understand something I feel, or wish I could feel, or wish I could not feel.  When a painting is finished I move quickly from artist to audience member.


So, would you say you are an objective viewer of your work?

No.

Would you elaborate?
Well, I wish I was.  I think I am pretty fair to myself if a piece really isn’t working.  However, I secretly like and dislike almost everything I paint.  I guess some of this comes from hoping things are getting better.


Well, I for one see progress.

You’re just saying that.

If we could get back to the animals for a bit.  Looking over your work it looks like you have used animals, and animal forms, for a long time.  Even back to your undergraduate days.  Do you ever see this as a hindrance or crutch?
Constantly.  Sometimes I look at my work an think; Animals? am I that emotionally/developmentally stunted?  How is this different from playing with action figures in my backyard.

Ouch.
Ouch is right.  Trust me I know.  Sometimes I look around and see people writing A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius and I am over here writing alternate endings to the Redwall series.  Sometimes I try and prop myself up with the extensive roll animals have played in art history.  Sometimes this works and sometimes it doesn’t.

Stay tuned for part II.