Bounding Boundaries

The MCC-Longview Cultural Arts Center presents:
“Bounding Boundaries” an art exhibition opening August 29th, 2013 and running through September 28th, 2013. There will be a reception on August 29th from 4-7pm. The Gallery Hours are 10-2, Tuesday–Thursday and Saturday. Located at 500 SW Longview Rd, Lee’s Summit, MO 64081
Exhibiting artists are: Adam Beris, Brandon Briscoe, Luke Kralik and Lee Piechocki

“Bounding Boundaries” portrays the expansion of disparate visual languages and their unusual subsequent intersections. Language is an authoritative system, which allows us to relate, assimilate and communicate with others, but simultaneously demands adherence to its structure.  It excludes letter groupings, words and phrases that to it are nonsensical, but under another language system might be perfectly acceptable.

The same is evident in the visual arts where artists are conditioned to adhere and obey their own visual system whether it be representational, abstract, symbolic, or a myriad of differing contemporary art movements such as, but not limited too; Realism, Impressionism, Cubism, Dada, Surrealism, Expressionism, Pop Art, Minimalism, Conceptual Art or Activist Art.

At times it can appear that a visual language is similar to a road infinitely drifting off in its own direction.  But in reality, those autonomous, one-lane roads usually find avenues where they end up intersecting with other languages.  Rather than drifting off into its own little abyss, we see numerous connections.

The idea that there can be multiple bounding, or pulsing boundaries; each one pushing against its neighbor gives hope for the possibility of common ground (shared space), personal discovery by means of seemingly apparent (possibly mistaken) differences and an intrigue to find more connections in other scenarios.

Simply put, when languages breakdown or become influenced by outside sources, there is now room for new personal meaning separate from the system.

Each artist in “Bounding Boundaries” utilizes multiple visual languages to produce their works of art.  And instead of searching for singular meaning or autonomy, on the contrary, there appears to be a great interest in the intersections and non-spaces where neither language holds authority and meaning is developed individually and momentarily.

For more information contact: Daniel Reneau • daniel.reneau@mcckc.edu

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